Archaeology Bibliography for Kevin Sharpe

Contents

 

Published. 1

Submitted for Publication. 7

In Process. 8

Unpublished. 9

Presentations. 17

Published

(* = to appear)

??? 132. The Paleolithic Fluters of Rouffignac Cave, France: Implications from a Forensic Study of Individuals toward Questions of Meaning (with Leslie Van Gelder). Proceedings of the UISPP-CISENP Colloquium, The Intellectual and Spiritual Expression of Non-Literate Peoples, Paris, 22-23 October 2007 (Capo de Ponte, Italy, 2007), pp. 107-108. Ref. 132/

Paleolithic Finger Flutings as Efficient Communication: Applying Zipfís Law to Two Panels in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). To appear in Semiotica. Ref. *133/AR52.

Two fluted panels in Rouffignac Cave, France, appear highly ordered as opposed to some other panels in this and other caves that appear haphazardly made. Is it possible objectively to establish that an intention to communicate thoughts and ideas lay behind the fluting of the two ordered panels? To help answer this, we use a relationship from communications theory called Zipfís Law, which can establish whether data represent Ďefficient communicationí or are random. Applying the law to the two panels (using the number of fingers in each fluted hand Ė what we take as the basic unit Ė as the central variable) shows that the two panels do constitute, at least provisionally, efficient communication. This result raises questions regarding the data, meaning, and the theory behind this methodological proposal and result. We conclude by discussing some of these matters, including the idea of Paleolithic notational markings.

Fluted Animals in the Zone of Crevices, Gargas Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). To appear in the Proceedings of the Eleventh Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Lisbon, Portugal, 4-9 September 2006. Ref. *131/AR106.

The (assumedly Paleolithic) finger flutings in Gargas Cave, France, have been known since 1907. Many are in poor condition, but in all they are extensive. This paper reports on a re-examination of some of them, namely the supposed animal figures drawn with one finger and found in the Zone of Crevices, comparing the studies by Breuil and BarriŤre with the actual drawings. Results point to the inaccuracy of the previous studies, suggesting that many of the figures probably do not depict animals as previously published. These figures and the other flutings in the cave require further study.

More about ĎMore about Finger Flutingsí (with Leslie Van Gelder). Rock Art Research 24:1 (2007), pp. 133-135. Ref. 130/AR102.

††††† ???Abstract

Human Uniqueness and Upper Paleolithic ĎArtí: An Archaeologistís Reaction to Wentzel van Huyssteenís Gifford Lectures (with Leslie Van Gelder). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 28:3 (September 2007), pp. 311-345. Ref. 129/AR97.

Wentzel van Huyssteenís Gifford Lectures, published as Alone in the World? Human Uniqueness in Science and Theology, attempt to rehabilitate the theological idea of imago Dei and depend for this on showing, among several other things, that religion formed an essential part of human life in the Upper Paleolithic. He tries to achieve this by enumerating David Lewis-Williamsí shamanic hypothesis, according to which the Paleolithic cave Ďartí of southwestern Europe evidences the activities of shamans. We supply evidence from our own research in Rouffignac and Gargas caves, two sites van Huyssteen refers to in support of his thesis, that, along with other challenges with his presentation, suggest the unlikelihood of a shamanic explanation.

Finger Flutings in Chamber A1 of Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Rock Art Research 23:2 (November 2006), pp. 179-198. Ref. 128/AR49.

An empirical methodology is used to examine finger flutings in Chamber A1, Rouffignac Cave, France, asking what they might reasonably tell about the people who made them. An initial result of this approach is that many of the flutings were probably made by young children aged 2-5 held aloft to touch the ceiling. Those holding the children were at times not only walking, but moving rotationally from their hips, perhaps in whole body movement. The question of the intentions behind the fluting activity is addressed, previously published reasons, characterizations, and meanings shown to be inaccurate or inadequate; the most promising intention, though not confirmed, is that the flutings were made possibly mainly for the tactile and aesthetic sensation and experience of fluting. Applying similar methodologies to the flutings found in Rouffignac Cave and elsewhere may further elucidate the behaviors behind their manufacture.

Evidence for Cave Marking by Paleolithic Children (with Leslie Van Gelder). Antiquity 80:310 (December 2006), pp. 937-947. Ref. 127/AR86.

Very little study of Paleolithic finger flutings has been undertaken, though they constitute a significant portion of prehistoric cave markings. Further, very little study of the people who created these artifacts has been undertaken by examining the markings themselves. An empirical methodology has now been developed to examine flutings. Through its application on particular fluted lines, it is possible to determine whether the people who drew them were, for instance, children. In particular, many of the flutings in Chamber A1 of Rouffignac Cave, France, were probably made by children aged 2-5, making this the first demonstration that some Paleolithic cave markings were created by people of this age. Applying similar methodologies to other flutings found in Rouffignac Cave and elsewhere may further elucidate the behaviors behind their manufacture and hence the life of Paleolithic people.

The Study of Finger Flutings (with Leslie Van Gelder). Cambridge Archaeological Journal 16:3 (October 2006), pp. 281-295. Ref. 126/AR84.

Historically, archaeologists have usually glossed over parietal finger flutings, especially nonfigurative and nonsymbolic fluted lines. This paper attempts to rectify this by saying something more concrete about them than that they exist. In particular, it develops a nomenclature and defines four forms to provide the fluting phenomenon with a workable language and a descriptive structure from which to build analyses. The paper also develops forensic and internal methodologies for such investigations, using experiments and studies of physiognomy to help derive information about the fluters from the flutings they created. The methods developed are applied to each of the four forms of flutings, showing which approaches may be the most useful for each form. Then broader questions and applications are touched on, including approaches to meaning, figures, and other families of parietal markings such as hand stencils. This approach to flutings augments other approaches to prehistoric Ďartí by seeking to know about the artists themselves, for instance their gender, age, size, handedness, and the number of individuals involved in creating a panel.

Four Forms of Finger Flutings as Seen in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). To appear in An Enquiring Mind, a Festschrift for Alexander Marshack, pp. 57-76. Ref. *125/AR95.

Building from Marshackís method of internal analysis, four forms of finger flutings are isolated and illustrated from Rouffignac Cave, France: Mirian, Evelynian, Rugolean, and Kirian. They are respectively characterized by lower-body movement by the fluter while fluting with more than one finger, lower-body movement and fluting with one finger, standing still and fluting with more than one finger, and standing still and fluting with one finger. Initial thoughts are provided as to where this analysis might lead.

2004 Rock Art Society of India Congress, the 10th Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations. International Newsletter on Rock Art 42 (2005), pp. 18-19. Ref. 124/AR88.

The 2004 Rock Art Society of India Congress, the 10th Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, was held from the 28th of November to the 2nd of December 2004 at the Hotel Jaypee Palace, Agra, India. It was attended by about 80 delegates from various parts of the world. The conference was enthusiastically opened by Shri S. Jaipal Reddy, the Honorable Union Minister, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting and Culture, the Government of India. Mrs. Neena Ranjan, Secretary, Department of Culture, Ministry of Culture, the Government of India, also attended. Immediately following the opening, Mr. Robert Bednarik presented the Professor V. S. Wakankar Memorial Lecture.

A Method for Studying Finger Flutings (with Leslie Van Gelder). In Exploring the Mind of Ancient Man: Festschrift to Robert G. Bednarik, ed. P. Chenna Reddy (New Delhi: Research India Press, 2006). Ref. 123/AR47.

Historically, archaeologists have usually glossed over parietal finger flutings, especially nonfigurative and nonsymbolic fluted lines. This paper attempts to rectify this by saying something more concrete about them than that they exist. In particular, it develops a nomenclature and a taxonomy based on four genera to provide the fluting phenomenon with a workable language and a descriptive structure from which to build analyses. The paper also develops methodologies for such investigations, using experiments and studies of physiognomy to help derive information about the fluters from the flutings they created. The methods developed are applied to each of the four genera of flutings, showing which approaches may be the most useful for each genus. Then broader questions and applications are touched on, including approaches to meaning, figures, and other families of parietal markings such as hand stencils. This approach to flutings marks a paradigmatic change for the study of prehistoric art, moving from trying to decipher meaning to seeking to know about the artists themselves, for instance their gender, age, size, and the number of individuals involved in creating a panel.

Techniques for Studying Finger Flutings (with Leslie Van Gelder). Society of Primitive Technology Bulletin 30 (Fall 2005), pp. 68-74. Ref. 122/AR94.

Archaeologists usually gloss over parietal finger flutings, especially the nonfigurative and nonsymbolic fluted lines. Yet these marks constitute a major portion of Paleolithic parietal Ďart,í whether in western Europe or Australia. This paper reports on an attempt to rectify this by developing a collection of forensic and internal methodologies for investigating the phenomena, using experiments, observations, and studies of physiognomy to help derive data about the fluters from the flutings they created. These methods can produce such information as each fluterís gender and age group, and the number of individuals involved in fluting a panel or a cave.

Alexander Marshack, 4 April 1918-20 December 2004 (with Leslie Van Gelder). Rock Art Research 22:1 (2005), pp. 98-99. Ref. 121/AR91.

The last time we saw Alex Marshack was in the autumn of 2004 at his and his wife Elaineís Greenwich Village apartment in New Yorkís Lower Manhattan. He had survived a stroke and a difficult period of healing, but his mind was as sharp as ever. ĎLet me see that thing,í he gestured to Leslieís camera. Alex and she had first become friends over their mutual love for photography and archaeology; they had to Ďtalk shopí about photography before we could get to talking about research. This was the ritual.

??? write to Jean for details Alexander Marshack, 1918-2004 (with Leslie Van Gelder). To appear in the International Newsletter on Rock Art. Ref. 120/AR90.

The last time we saw Alex Marshack was in the autumn of 2004 at his and his wife Elaineís Greenwich Village apartment in New Yorkís Lower Manhattan. He had survived a stroke and a difficult period of healing, but his mind was as sharp as ever. ĎLet me see that thing,í he gestured to Leslieís camera. Alex and she had first become friends over their mutual love for photography and archaeology; they had to Ďtalk shopí about photography before we could get to talking about research. This was the ritual.

Children and Paleolithic ĎArtí: Indications from Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). International Newsletter on Rock Art 38 (2004), pp. 9-17. Ref. 118/AR77.

This paper develops and provisionally applies an empirical methodology to examine finger flutings in Chamber A1 of Rouffignac Cave, France, asking what can be known from the flutings about the people who made them. The results suggest that many of the flutings were made by children held aloft to touch the ceiling and draw their hands along it. Those holding the children were at times not only walking, but moving rotationally from their hips, perhaps in whole body movement such as dancing. This may be the first demonstrable case of Paleolithic cave Ďartí made by children. Applying similar methodologies to the severines found elsewhere may also help elucidate the behaviors behind their manufacture.

Rejoinder to Comments by Geoffrey D. Aslin, Robert G. Bednarik, and R. G. Gunn [Rejoinder to comments on ĎLine Markings: Human or Animal Origin?í] Rock Art Research 21:1 (May 2004), pp. 78-84. Ref. 117/AR55.

Robert, the editor of this journal, must be a big person to publish a paper challenging him to take his work further. However, his magnanimity does not excuse the groundless personal and professional attack he writes in his response. My rejoinder will not reply in kind Ė this is not an attack on Robert himself Ė but will try to correct the misinformation about me and re-point the discussion to the relevant issue.

Koonalda Cave: The Beginning of Artistic Expression (by Christine E. Sharpe) (editor). New Quarterly Cave 2:3 (1977), pp. 226-234. Ref. 113/AR30.

The story of the beginning of human artistic expression is a fascinating field and one which is as yet still in its infancy. Art does not have its first roots in the wonderfully expressive bison and rugged hairy ponies depicted in ochres and char≠coal on the walls of such caves as Altimira or Lascaux. Rather it originates in the strange tangle of finger scrawls and stick scratches which lie beneath these pictures. These form no recognizable image, no animal shapes, or even an ordered arrangement which we could arbitrarily call a symbol.

Line Markings as Systems of Notation? (with Mary Lacombe). In News 95: International Rock Art Congress Ė North, East, West, South, 1995 IRAC Ė 30 August-6 September 1995 Ė Proceedings (Pinerolo, Italy: IFRAO Ė International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, 1999), p. 46 and <NEWS 95 Ė International Rock Art Congress Proceedings_files/sharp.htm>. Ref. 82/AR04. Revised as 1999 version. Ref. 99/AR14. Also In Rock Art and Epistemology: Courting Sophistication. International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Vol. 3, ed. Robert G. Bednarik (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers, 1999). Ref. 103/AR32.

Why did pre-Historic peoples mark lines on various surfaces in Europe, Australia, and other places? We propose that some of the markings are systems of notation, in particular mnemonic forms of ritual stories. To discuss this hypothesis, we look at the finger markings in Koonalda Cave, South Australia. We devise a set of propositions susceptible to in situ investigation which elucidate one way the markings might be notational.

Line Markings: Human or Animal Origin? Rock Art Research 21:1 (May 2004), pp. 57-84. Ref. 100/AR09.

The origin Ė whether human or animal Ė of line marks found in a cave has obvious implications for what used the cave and whether or not the prehistorian shows interest in the site. Some line marks are obviously human, some are obviously animal scratches, some are obviously geological and, from among the remainder, some could have a human or an animal origin. This paper focuses on markings in the last category and it seeks a balanced, systematic, communicable, and empirical way to determine their origin.

Investigating Finger Flutings (with Mary Lacombe and Helen Fawbert). Rock Art Research 19:2 (2002), pp. 109-116. Ref. 92/AR13.

Extending previous experiments on finger flutings (lines made with fingers on a soft surface), this review delineates differences between marks made: by different individuals, with different fingers and hands, in different directions and orders, in various shapes, and when comfort and discomfort are considered. The method and results are then preliminarily applied to markings in three French caves (Grotte ŗ Goutran, Grotte de Rouffignac, and Grotte du Pech-Merle). More information on flutings can be obtained this way than in previous investigations, and it helps ascertain how the flutings were made and contributes to the discussion on the linesí possible meaning.

An Analysis of Prehistoric Engravings on Boulders in Koonalda Cave, South Australia (with Christine E. Sharpe). In National Geographic Society Research Reports, 1976 Projects (Washington, DC: National Geographic Society, 1978), pp. 31-50. Ref. 88/AR29.

An investigation of engravings on boulders in the northwest passage of Koonalda Cave, South Australia, was undertaken in January 1976 on an expedition supported by the National Geographic Society and the South Australian Museum.

During the summer of 1972-1973, my husband, Kevin Sharpe, and I were part of a group led by Alexander Gallus to examine evidence of a prehistoric people who utilized Koonalda Cave. There, we found careful≠ly engraved boulders on the floor of the caveís Upper Chamber. Koonalda Cave has been known over many years for its prehistoric flint mining, stone constructions, and markings at least 20,000 years old made by human fingertips being stroked across the soft, powdery limestone surface of the cave walls.

Whose Heritage? The Conflict between the Living and the Dead within Archaeology (with Helen Fawbert). Science & Spirit 9:5 (Winter 1998-1999), pp. 4-5. Ref. 72/CO17.

All humans have rights Ė do the dead have rights and should we uphold them? Can the past will of the remains in a tomb be deemed a rational will? Are their rights are still valid?

An Externalism in Order to Communicate (with Mary Lacombe and Helen Fawbert). The Artefact 21 (1998), pp. 95-104. Ref. 68/AR11.

Sandor Gallus highlighted the significance of the line markings in Koonalda cave in 1956. Further examples, in caves throughout southern Australia, have led to a reassessment of Gallus's suggestion that the lines, dated to the late Pleistocene, were a means of communication Ė a hypothesis that contravened established opinion. Using the hypothesis of Gallus as a starting point, we describe our hypothesis, experimental method, and results. We suggest that the lines are a mnemonic notation system and, by their artificial reproduction, we will pose questions regarding form, technique, and structural consistencies that will help to elucidate their meaning.

Prehistoric Cave Markings: Prelude to an Australian Seminar. Insight: News from the Graduate School of the Union Institute 2 (Fall 1990-Winter 1991), pp. 10-11. Ref. 34/AR18.

Driving towards Koonalda Cave for the first time, I became philosophical about the abandoned car bodies left to rot in the sun. But I still feel shaken by the dead wombats. These endearing Australian marsupials, ordinarily never seen because they are nocturnal, were dead in their hundreds. The bodies littering the roadside were not the victims of hit-and-run drivers. The killer was the drought experienced on the Nullarbor Plain that year.

A Preliminary Survey of Engraved Boulders in the Art Sanctuary of Koonalda Cave, South Australia (with Christine E. Sharpe). Mankind 10:3 (June 1976), pp. 125-130. Ref. 6/AR25.

Koonalda Cave is in South Australia, fifty-four miles from the Western Australian border and fourteen miles from the sea. It contains evidence of late Pleistocene occupation in the form of artifact assemblages, sculptural stelae and wall markings similar to the Ďmacaronií of European caves. This paper is a preliminary survey of these markings.

Submitted for Publication

Symbol Making by a Young Child of the Upper Paleolithic. Ref. S/AR104.

Tectiforms constitute an accepted class of Paleolithic symbols from caves in the region of the French village of Les Eyzies de Tayac-Sireuil. This paper focuses on one tectiform from Rouffignac Cave, which we find was probably created by a girl aged between two and five. We also compare the tectiform with two other clusters of finger flutings found in Rouffignac that this young child also created and that appear at first glance perhaps to constitute examples of another symbol or sign. An analysis of the clusters undermines this hypothesis. We then address the issues of the meaning and origin of such symbols.

A Counterexample to the Shamanic Hypothesis regarding Prehistoric Rock Art. Ref. S/AR93.

The Lewis-Williams hypothesis on the shamanic origin of prehistoric art, extrapolating from the San art in southern Africa to worldwide, has become increasingly popular as a universal explanation of such artifacts. While critiques of this approach have taken many angles, a primary issue is whether it is empirically valid and fruitful in the study of particular sites or panels, or with particular types of art. This contribution to the discussion focuses on finger flutings (the lines that human fingers leave when drawn over a soft surface) from the Upper Paleolithic, specifically from Rouffignac Cave in France. It shows the improbability of the shaman and related phosphene hypotheses for the origin of the flutings in the Desbordes Panel in the cave, and suggests the need for criteria to decide when the hypothesis is or is not appropriate for a particular site.

Dreaming Time. [Previous versions known as Koonalda: Prehistoric Mind and an Australian Cave, and Dreaming No Manís Land.] Ref. S/AR36.

A hundred feet above a lake no sunlight has ever seen, I squeeze from a slit in the rocks so narrow that my head scrapes against the ceiling and, if I breathe too hard, Iím trapped. With lamp in hand in front of me, I come out to the ledge above the lake: a thin, narrow strip of limestone rock. I lie on my back and shine the light above me. Thousands of finger markings rain down from the rock, mixing with lines engraved with stone tools. I am not the first person here. But it has been many thousands of years since the people who made these marks came deep into Koonalda Cave, climbing in darkness through the same stone landscape, to leave their marks on these walls.

 

Why did they come and why did they mark?

The Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia: Its Rockfalls, their Weathering and Use. [Also known as ĎThe Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia,í and ĎThe Smoothing and Rounding Process of the Boulders in the Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia.í] Ref. S/AR23.

This paper describes the Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave in which, perhaps 19,000 years ago or more, people engraved the walls, marked the walls with their fingers, engraved and arranged the rocks on the floor, and deposited animal parts, all under light of torches some of whose remains still sit where left on the tops of boulders. The visitors may have used the whole of the Upper Chamber in this way, though rockfalls more recent cover the majority of evidence for this. The Upper Chamber contains at least five rockfalls of different ages and degrees of weathering. The boulders of the oldest collapse show prehistoric human use and line markings, with sparse or no markings on other areas. Under the most recent rockfalls, however, lies the original smooth, rounded, and marked boulder floor. The boulders on the floor possibly weather by a process called salt weathering to become smooth and rounded.

In Process

The Tectiforms in Rouffignac Cave, France: A Forensic and Internal Analysis. Ref. I/AR105.

A major paper on tectiforms, focusing on those in Rouffignac Cave.

Animal Scratches versus Human Engravings: New Research. Ref. I/AR69.

New research on the animal versus human origin of some engraved line markings in caves.

Our View of the Paleolithic Reflects Ourselves: Implicit Religion through Henri Breuil and David Lewis-Williams. Ref.I/SR95.

Abstract ??? see presentations for what looks like a repeat.

I1.        ##Rugolean Flutings as Writing (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR53.htm.

I2.        2004-2005 Archaeology Grant Application: Outline. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR82.htm.

I3.        Severines as Protowriting (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR68.htm.

I4.        Severines in Rouffignac Cave, France: Implications for Paleolithic Ideas of Ultimate Reality and Meaning (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR67.htm.

I5.        Humanly Engraved Lines in Bob Cat Cave, Wyoming (with Jeff Cooper). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR64.htm.

I6.        Toward New Forms of Severines in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR63.htm.

I7.        Applying Zipf, Internal, and Forensic Analyses to Three Panels of Finger Flutings in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR62.htm.

I1.        Mirian Finger Flutings in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR61.htm.

I2.        A Panel of Multi-Media Severines in Chamber E of Rouffignac Cave, France. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR50.htm.

I3.        Revisiting Figures in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR48.htm.

I4.        The Study of Finger Flutings (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR46.htm.

I5.        Ideas for Writing, Field, and Laboratory Research on Line Markings. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR34.htm.

I6.        Dating of Human Use of Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR28.htm.

I7.        Our Ancestors Touch Us: The Writing of Early Humans (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR06.htm.

I8.        The Finger Flutings of Gargas Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR79.htm.

I9.        The Floor of the Fluted Subchamber, Chamber A1, Rouffignac Cave, France(with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR80.htm.

Unpublished

unpublished*116. Trois Formes de Tracťs Digitaux (ou Sevťrines) en Grotte de Rouffignac, France (with Leslie Van Gelder) [Three Forms of Finger Flutings (or Severines) in Rouffignac Cave, France]. To appear in Prťhistoire du Sud-Ouest.

U135. My Archaeology Writing Fragment. Unpublished. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR130.htm.

U134. My Theology Writing Fragments. Unpublished. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT55.htm.

U133. A Play. An unpublished manuscript. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT52.pdf.

U132. A Theology for the Reality of God. Unpublished book manuscript, 1984. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT54.htm.

U131. A letter from Alexander Gallus. Unpublished dated 7 November 1978. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR129.pdf

U130. Markings in the Koonalda Style Ė Some Australian Sites. An unpublished book chapter. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR126.htm.

U129. Religion and the Anthropic Principle of Physical Cosmology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR42.pdf.

U128. Religious Snippets: Reflections from Down Under. Unpublished book, 1983. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT53.htm.

U127. Philosophical Implications. An unpublished book chapter. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PH04.pdf.

U126. Aim, Method, and Results of the 1976 Expedition (with Christine E. Sharpe). An unpublished report. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR127.pdf.

U125. Mind, Matter, and Theology. An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM18.pdf.

U124. Project Description Questions. From a 2002 grant application. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR125.pdf.

U123. The Law of Complexification. An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR99.pdf.

U122. The Cosmic Blueprint. An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR98.pdf.

U121. A Proposed Expedition to Koonalda Cave, South Australia, in Mid-1982. A research proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR124.pdf.

U120. Jenny, Great Uncle Punctatus, and the White Wind. An unpublished short story. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO48.pdf.

U119. Burrow Bickering. An unpublished short story. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO47.pdf.

U118. The Theological Task Today. An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT50.pdf.

U117. Some Thoughts onTheology. An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT49.pdf.

U116. Some Thoughts on 'Objectivity Versus Subjectivity.' An unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY14.pdf.

U115. 31/12/69. An unpublished poem. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT48.pdf.

U114. Madness Ė Be My Friend. An unpublished story. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT47.pdf.

U113. The Camel. An unpublished story. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT46.pdf.

U112. Catastrophe Theory. Notes on CT and theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM17.pdf.

U111. The Upper Pleistocene Cave Sanctuaries in Australia and Europe and the Origins of Religious Behavior in Man, by Alexander Gallus. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR123.pdf.

U110. Australian Markings in the Koonalda Style. A research proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR122.pdf.

U109. Translating Paleolithic Line Markings. Unpublished conference preliminary paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR007.pdf.

U108. Reconceptualizing Science and Religion on the Basis of the Study of the 16 Fundamental Motives. A conference presentation proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR96.htm.

U107. Journal of Science and Spirit. A preliminary proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR97.pdf.

U106. The Emergent Order: Cause or Effect? A conference paper proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY13.pdf.

U105. Mathematical Metaphysics. A book proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM16.pdf.

U104. Meaning and Transformation. Unpublished paper. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT44.pdf.

U103. Story about a Wedding and a Wedding Reception. Unpublished story/reflection. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT45.pdf.

U102. A Theological Vision. A short reflection. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO46.pdf.

U101. The Rev. Trev Goes to Church. A short reflection. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO45.pdf.

U100. The Rev. Trev Throttles a Ewe. A short reflection. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO44.pdf.

U99. Australian Line Markings. A research project proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR121.pdf.

U98. Dialogue with the Silent Rock (with Tony Van Witsen). A TV documentary proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR120.pdf.

U97. The Past Moves Forward. A book proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP51.pdf.

U96. Archaeology, 'Doing Theology Scientifically,' and the Laws of Life. A proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP49.pdf.

U95. Australia's Early Writing. A proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR119.htm.

U94. Finger Markings in Caves: Further Research Results. A proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR118.htm.

U93. The Analysis of Digital Line Markings. A proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR117.htm.

U92. An Empiricist Challenge to Theological Method: Gordon Kaufman's and David Tracy's Proposals with Reference to the Skepticism of Kai Nielsen. A proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/TM17.htm.

U91. An Experimental Technique for Examining Prehistoric Finger Markings in Caves. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR116.htm.

U90. Proposal for the Stanton Lectureship in the Philosophy of Religion, 2006-2009. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PH03.htm.

U89. The Scientific Approaches to Love and their Challenges to Theology. Unaccepted submission for a conference presentation. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT39.htm.

U88. The Empirical Approaches to Happiness and their Challenges to Theology. Unaccepted submission for a conference presentation. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT38.htm.

U87. Report on Work in Gargas Cave, 2003-2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR85.htm.

U86. Whatís Written on the Walls? The Use of Story, Science, and Methodology in Untangling Lines in French Prehistoric Cave Art. Accepted but unpresented for the Third Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, 13-16 January 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR81.htm.

U85. Religion and the Pursuit of Happiness. Accepted but unpresented for the Third Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, 13-16 January 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP45.htm.

U84. 2003-2004 Archaeology Grant Application: Outline. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR78.htm.

U83. Finger Flutings and the Evolution of Language and Cognition (with Leslie Van Gelder). Proposed conference presentation. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP43.htm.

U82. Prehistoric Finger Flutings in Rouffignac Cave. PowerPoint presentation (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR57.htm.

U81. The Duplicity of Dualism. Proposed conference presentation. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR93.htm.

U80. Lee Smolinís Cosmology, the Anthopic Principle, and Theology.

U79. The Nature of God-World Relationships.

U78. Wilde Lectureship Proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR30.htm.

U77. Morality of the Whole as in the Universe-as-a-Whole.

U76. Radio Programs Proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR27.htm.

U75. Column for the New York Times on Science & Spirit.

U74. Proposal for ghost writing John Templetonís, The Humble Approach.

U73. Feminism and Science and Religion.

U72. Is there evidence of universal purpose in the cosmos? Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY11.htm.

U71. Theology and Theologies. Unpublished book chapter. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT35.pdf.

U70. Environment, Meaning, and Happiness: From Science to Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT30.htm.

U69. Religion for New Zealand Land. An unpublished book manuscript. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT28.htm.

U68. Knowledge of God: Happiness and a Scientific Method for Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT27.htm.

U67. Science and Models of the Divine: The Need for Radical Reconstruction. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT26.htm.

U66. An Approach to Theology and Religion.

U65. Bampton Lectures 2001 proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT10.htm.

U64. What the Psychobiology of Fundamental Motivation tells us about Providence. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT09.htm.

U63. Downward Causation Models: Godís Interaction with the World. A book outline. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM01.pdf.

U62. Murphy and Ellis and Levels. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT08.htm.

U61. A Naturalistic Account of Divine Action in the Universe. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT07.htm.

U60. Theology from Science. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT04.htm.

U59. A Physical Yet Spiritual Basis for Consciousness: From The Neuroscience of Roger Penrose, or The Neuroscience of Roger Penrose and Godís Interaction with the World, 1994. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT03.htm.

U58. Approaching the Unapproachable: Quantum Perspectives on an Infinite God.

U57. Paleolithic Story Telling? Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP41.htm.

U56. The God Spot: From Prehistoric Spiritual Experience to Todayís Christianity. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP36.htm.

U55. Agape and Oxytocin. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP35.htm.

U54. Love, Happiness, and Purpose: Divine Desires or Biological Instincts? Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP34.htm.

U53. The Laws of Life Program. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP33.htm.

U52. Proposal for the Hulsean Lectures, 1999-2000. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP32.htm.

U51. Proving Evolutionary Psychology.

U50. Hereditarily Happy: Reconciling Empirical and Religious Approaches to the Concept of Happiness. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP25.htm.

U49. Self-Consciousness: Evolutionary Biology Invites Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP13.htm.

U48. John Bowker on Sociobiology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP12.htm.

U47. Sociobiology Attacks Christian Morality.

U46. Morality and Religion Intersect Biology: Sociobiology and Altruism. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP09.htm.

U45. Sociobiology to Help Build Morality. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP03.htm.

U44. Aquinas and What God Does. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO15.htm.

U43. A Collection of Columns on Science and Religion, 1997. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/CO12.htm.

U42. The Physics of David Bohm and the Algebraic Theory of Reality: Their Theological Potential. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/BM16.htm.

U41. Bohm and Earth Ethics.

U40. The Physics of David Bohm.

U39. A Theology Based on David Bohmís Holomovement Metaphysics: An Outline for Possible Research. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/BM09.htm.

U38. Report, Koonalda Expedition, 1976 January (by Alexander Gallus). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR73.pdf.

U37. Expedition to Koonalda Cave, January 1976 (by Graeme L. Pretty). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR72.pdf.

U36. Report, Koonalda Expedition, January 1975 (by Alexander Gallus). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR71.htm.

U35. A Newly Discovered Art Sanctuary in Koonalda Cave, South Australia (by Christine E. Sharpe) (editor). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR58.htm.

U34. The Meaning of Engraved Lines.

U33. Report II from Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR43.htm.

U32. Report for the South Australian Museum on the Koonalda 1976 Expedition. 1976. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR42.htm.

U31. Report for the South Australian Museum on the Koonalda 1976 Expedition (by Christine E. Sharpe) (KS editor). Unpublished report. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR41.htm.

U30. Report for the National Geographic Society on the Koonalda 1976 Expedition (with C. E. Sharpe, A. Gallus, and N. Chadwick). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR40.pdf.

U29. Report on the New Art Form in Koonalda Cave, South Australia (by Christine E. Sharpe) (KS editor). An unpublished report. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR39.pdf.

U28. Teaching the Spirit of the Land. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR37.htm.

U27. Reading between the Lines: A New Approach to Cave Art. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR35.htm.

U26. Report I from Rouffignac Cave, France(with Leslie Van Gelder). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR33.htm.

U25. Reflections after Our First Visit to Les Eyzies. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR21.htm.

U24. Line Markings in Australia: A Study of the Sites, Origins, and Analysis of Archaic Line Markings in Australian Caves.

U23. The Scientific Method as a Theological Method. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/TM02.htm and www.ksharpe.com/word/TM13.

U22. Building a Ladder with Science and Theology.

U21. Our Thinking as Myth: Implications for Science, Philosophy, and Religion. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR46.htm.

U20. Archaeology, Religion, and the Bible. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR38.htm.

U19. A Note on Wall Markings in Koonalda and Wombat Caves, South Australia (by Alexander Gallus) (editor). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR16.htm.

U18. The Boulder Engravings in the Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia (with Christine E. Sharpe). Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR20.htm.

U17. Exploring the Edge of Historical Knowledge. A research project proposal. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR17.htm.

U16. Line Markings as Systems of Notation: Reading Rock Art. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR14.htm.

U15. The Meaning of Finger Flutings. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR12.htm.

U14. The Role of Experience in a Scientific Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/TM14.htm.

U13. Beyond Complementarity: The ĎLadderí Model for the Integration of Science and Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR56.htm.

U12. Beyond Donald MacKayís Complementarity for Relating Science and Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR44.htm.

U11. Holomovement Metaphysics and Theology. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/BM13.htm.

U10. A Theology Based on David Bohmís Holomovement Metaphysics: An Outline for Possible Research. Unpublished, 1991.

U9. What is a Myth?

U8. A Working Paper on the Meanders in Koonalda Cave, South Australia. Privately Circulated, 1982. [Rewritten as ĎAn Analysis of Linear Markings as a Form of Writing,í Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR24.htm.] Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR03.htm.

U7. Kiwi Rugby and Kiwi Religion.

U6. Representing the Partial Order and Lattice Structures of a Set by Its Topological Structures. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM14.pdf.

U5. The Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia: A Second Report (with Christine E. Sharpe). 1980. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR22.htm. Refereesí Reports available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR66.htm.

U4. Prehistoric Religion: How Archaeology Can Help the Study of Religion, with Special Reference to Koonalda Cave, South Australia. [Second version known as ĎPrehistoric Religion.í] Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR59.htm.

U3. A Relationship between Group Topologies.

U2. The Hawley Property for the Additive Reals and Compact Group Topologies for the Multiplicative Reals.

U1. Continuous Points in Topological Groups. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MM06.pdf.

Presentations

I10.    PRESENTATION Intentions behind Finger Flutings in the Desbordes Subchamber, Rouffignac Cave, France. Ref. I/AR87.

P101. Love and Implicit Religion. Proposal for an unpresented but accepted paper presentation at the Leipzig ISSR 2007 conference. Proposal available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP52.htm.

P100. The Implicit Religion Underlying Interpretations of European Prehistoric Art. Presented to the Denton Conference, 2008. Proposal available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR128.htm. SEE Our View of the Paleolithic Reflects Ourselves: Implicit Religion through Henri Breuil and David Lewis-Williams. Ref.I/SR95. IT SEEMS TO BE THE SAME ENTRY. UNDER I.

P99. Sermon for Induction into the Maclaurin Chaplaincy. Unpublished sermon. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT51.pdf.

P98. Translating Paleolithic Line Markings. Presented to IFRAO, Turino. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR007.pdf.

P97. Nightmares. Presented to the Second Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 10-13 May 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR100.htm.

P96. The Individuals of Rouffignac Cave. Presented to the Third Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 19-23 May 2007. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR99.htm.?????

P95. The Biology of Meaning. Presented to the Fourth Roundstone Conversation, Roundstone, Ireland, 23-27 April 2008. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT43.htm.

P94. A Forensic Study of the Paleolithic Fluters of Rouffignac Cave, France. Presented to the Institute of Archaeology, Oxford University, 25 October 2007. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR116.htm.

P93. Initial Results of a Forensic Study of the Paleolithic Fluters of Rouffignac Cave, France. Presented to the British Rock Art Group Conference, Cambridge, 5-6 May 2007. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR112.htm.

P92. Reconceptualizing Science and Religion on the Basis of the Study of the 16 Fundamental Motives. Submitted for consideration as a conference presentation. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR96.htm.

P91. Research on Prehistoric Line Markings (as of July 2006). Presented to the Initial Academic Residency, Ph.D. Program, Union Institute & University, Cincinnati, 12 July 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR101.htm.

P90. Finger Flutings in Gargas Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Eleventh Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Lisbon, Portugal, 4-9 September 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR103.htm.

P89. Upper Paleolithic ĎArtí and Human Uniqueness: An Archaeologistís Reaction to Wentzel van Huyssteenís Gifford Lectures. Presented to the Highlands Institute of American Religious and Philosophical Thought, Highlands, North Carolina, 12-15 June 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR98.htm.

P88. Nightmares. Presented to the Second Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 10-13 May 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR100.htm.

P87. Whatís Written on the Walls: Prehistoric Line Markings. Presented to the Second Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 10-13 May 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR99.htm.

P86. The Sense of Meaning and Implicit Religion. Presented to the Twenty-Ninth Denton Conference on Implicit Religion, Denton, Yorkshire, England, 5-7 May 2006. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP49.htm.

P85. Paleolithic Cave Art: Reports, Issues, and Directions and Methodologies for Research. Workshop Offered at the Tenth Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations and the Rock Art Society of India 2004 Congress, Agra, India, 28 November-1 December 2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR74.htm.

P84. Finger Flutings in Rouffignac and Gargas Caves, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Thirteenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 3-6 August 2005.

P83. Response to Alexander A. Berezin, ĎSimulation argument in the context of the Ultimate Reality and Meaning.í Presented to the Thirteenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 3-6 August 2005.

P82. Response toStoyan Sarg, ĎAlternative Concept about Space (Physcial Vacuum) Leading to a Different Vision about the Universe.í Presented to the Thirteenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 3-6 August 2005.

P81. Finger Fluting Forms in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the World Cultureís Program, Waldwick High School, Waldwick, New Jersey, 29 January 2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR51.htm.

P80. Finger Flutings in Rouffignac and Gargas Caves, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to Clearview Christian Girls School, Pukalani, Maui, Hawaii, January 2005.

P79. Finger Flutings in Rouffignac and Gargas Caves, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate College, Union Institute & University, Cincinnati, Ohio, 22 January 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR89.htm.

P78. Science of the Soul. Presented to Butler University, Indianapolis, Indiana, 22 February 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP47.htm.

P77. Divine Projections. Presented at the Conference of Highlands Institute of American Religious and Philosophical Thought, Highlands, North Carolina, 22-25 June 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT37.htm.

P76. Awakening Dreams. Presented to the First Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 23-27 March 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR92.htm.

P75. Theology as Subject to Modern Experience. Presented to the First Roundstone Conversation on Place and Story, Roundstone, Co. Galway, Ireland, 23-27 March 2005. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/TM15.htm.

P74. Visualizing the Rock Art Discipline (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Tenth Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations and the Rock Art Society of India 2004 Congress, Agra, India, 28 November-1 December 2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR83.htm.

P73. The Finger Flutings of Rouffignac and Gargas Caves, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Tenth Congress of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations and the Rock Art Society of India 2004 Congress, Agra, India, 28 November-1 December 2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR70.htm. Proposal available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR54.htm.

P72. Implicit Religion and the Pursuit of Happiness. Presented to the Twenty-Seventh Denton Conference on Implicit Religion, Denton, Yorkshire, England, 7-9 May 2004. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP40.htm.

P71. Prehistoric Finger Markings in Rouffignac Cave, France: Asking Questions on an Edge. Presented to the Symposium, ĎMargins, Boundaries, and Thresholds: Creativity across the Disciplines,í Vermont College of Union Institute & University, Montpellier, Vermont, 9-12 October 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR76.htm.

P70. Response to Ronald Glasberg, ĎUltimate Reality and Meta-Solutions to Fundamental Problems.í Presented to the Twelfth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 13-16 August 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PH02.htm.

P69. Response to Alexander Berezin, ĎIdeas of Multidimensional Time, Parallel Universes, and Eternity in Physics and Metaphysics.í Presented to the Twelfth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 13-16 August 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY06.htm.

P68. Severines in Rouffignac Cave, France: Implications for Paleolithic Ideas of Ultimate Reality and Meaning (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the Twelfth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 13-16 August 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR75.htm.

P67. The Flow of Time: Scientific and Theological Perspectives. Presented to ĎTime and Eternity: A Science and Religion Symposium,í the C. S. Lewis Oxbridge Summer Institute, Cambridge University, England, 21-26 July 2002. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY12.htm.

P66. Knowledge of God: Happiness and a Scientific Method for Theology. Presented to ĎTime and Eternity: A Science and Religion Symposium,í the C. S. Lewis Oxbridge Summer Institute, Oxford University, England, 14-20 July 2002. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT31.htm.

P65. Finger Fluting Forms in Rouffignac Cave, France (with Leslie Van Gelder). Presented to the World Cultureís Program, Waldwick High School, Waldwick, New Jersey, 29 January 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR51.htm.

P64. Homo Narrans: The Storying Species and Prehistoric Finger Flutings. Presented to the Humanities Symposium, Northern Valley Regional High School, Demarest, New Jersey, 2-3 October 2002. A version available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR57.htm.

P63. Place, Story, and the Minds of Our Ancestors. Presented to the panel discussion, ĎPlacing the Spirit in ďThe Spirit of Place,ĒĎ the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment conference, ĎCreativity, Culture, and Environment,í Boston, Massachusetts, 6 June 2003. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/AR56.htm.

P62. The Minds of Our Ancestors. Presented to the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (UK) Conference, ĎCreativity, Culture, and Environment,í University of Leeds, Bretton Hall Campus, Wakefield, Yorkshire, United Kingdom, 6-8 September 2002.

P61. The Upper Chamber of Koonalda Cave, South Australia: Its Rockfalls, their Weathering, and Use. Presented to the biannual meeting of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Alice Springs, Australia, July 2000.

P60. Incised Linear Markings: Animal or Human Origin? Presented to the biannual meeting of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Alice Springs, Australia, July 2000.

P59. An Analysis of Finger Flutings. Presented to the biannual meeting of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations, Alice Springs, Australia, July 2000.

P58. Interview on WEVO, National Public Radio, 28 July 2001.

P57. Response to Raymond Welch, ĎLoren Eiseley: On Being Home Alone.í Presented to the Conference on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, Toronto, 17 August 2001.

P56. Knowledge of Ultimate Reality: Happiness and a Scientific Method for Spiritual Thought. Presented to the Conference on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, Toronto, 15-18 August 2001. [Also known as, ĎKnowledge of Ultimate Reality and Meaning: Happiness and the Scientific Method.í]

P55. Providence and the Biology of Purpose (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the International Conference, ĎScience & Faith: The Problem of the Human Being in Science and Theology,í St. Petersburg School of Religion and Philosophy, St. Petersburg, Russia, 30 November-2 December 2000.

P54. Paleolithic Cave Paintings and Human Spirituality. Presented to the CTNS Public Forum, Berkeley, California, 12 September 2000.

P53. Presentation workshop on Sleuthing the Divine. Institute on Religion in an Age of Science annual Star Island conference, August 2000.

P52. If You Come to San Francisco, Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in Your Hair: Relating Scientific and Spiritual Thought. Presented to the Hursley Society, Keble College, Oxford University, 26 May 2000. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR33.htm.

P51. Reductionism and Emergence in Chessworld and our World. Presented to the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology, Lyons, France, April 2000. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/MT14.htm.

P50. From Physics to Religion: David Bohm Inspires A Vision of the Divine. Presented to the International Meeting, ĎScience and Religion,í UNESCO and the Universitť Interdisciplinaire de Paris, Paris, France, 12-13 April 2000. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR24.htm.

P49. Religion and Science: Evolving toward Enlightenment. Presented to the Parliament of the Worldís Religions, Cape Town, South Africa, 1-8 December 1999.

P48. Explaining the Origin. Presented to the Science and Religion Forum Annual Meeting, Human Significance and Modern Cosmology, Durham, England, 9-11 September 1999. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY10.pdf.

P47. The Flow of Time: Scientific Perspectives. Presented to the Center for Research in Science conference, Asuza Pacific University, Asuza, California, 29-31 July 1999.

P46. The Ultimate Reality of Energy as a Unifying Paradigm in the Next Millennium: The Elusive …lan Vital. Presented to the Symposium, ĎEnergy,í at the Conference on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, Toronto, 19-21 August 1999.

P45. Prehistoric Art in Australia and Europe. Presented to the Society of Ordained Scientists, Guildford, England, 6 May 1999.

P44. The Anthropic Principle: How Not to Use It. Presented to the 10th Kentucky State ILS Conference, Frankfort, Kentucky,8-10 April 1999. Available as, ĎThe Anthropic Principle: Life in the Universe,í at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY02.htm.

P43. Presentation to the Center for Research in Science, Azusa, California, 20 January 1999.

P42. Determining Our Future: Quantum Solutions to the Problem of Free Will. Presented to the Science & Medical Network, Green College, Oxford University, England, 3 November 1998. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/PY03.htm.

P41. Finger Markings in Caves: Further Research Results (with Mary Lacombe and Helen Fawbert). Presented to the International Rock Art Conference, Vila Real, Portugal, 6-12 September 1998.

P40. Behavioral Genetics: The New Reductionism? (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the Silver Anniversary Conference of the Center for Process Studies, Claremont School of Theology and Claremont Graduate School, Claremont, USA, 4-9 August 1998.

P39. Theology Can Use the Scientific Method and Still Be Theology (with Jonathan Walgate). Presented to the Science Symposium of the C. S. Lewis Summer Institute, Oxford University, England, 19-24 July 1998. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/TM05.htm.

P38. Camellias and Happiness: An Integration of Science and Religion (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the Science Symposium of the C. S. Lewis Summer Institute, Oxford University, England, 19-24 July 1998.

P37. Belief in a Just World: An Implicit Religion (with Jonathan Walgate). Presented to the Twenty-First Denton Conference on Implicit Religion, Denton, Yorkshire, England, 8-10 May 1998.

P36. Human Behavior, Genetics, and Theology (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the Ian Ramsey Centre Seminar, University of Oxford, England, April 1998. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP26.htm.

P35. Human Behavioral Genetics and Theology (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology, Durham, England, 31 March-5 April 1998.

P34. Implicit Religion and Inter Faith Dialogue: A Scientific Perspective (with Rebecca Bryant). Presented to the Inaugural Conference on Implicit Religion in Inter Faith Perspective, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, England, 23 March 1998.

P33. Hereditarily Happy: Biology and Ultimate Reality and Meaning. Presented to the Genome Symposium, the Ninth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, Toronto, Canada, 20-23 August 1997.

P32. God and Michael Ruse on Altruism. Workshop conducted at the Annual Star Island Conference of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, 26 July-2 August 1997. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP10.htm.

P31. Genes to Happiness to God. Presented to the Oxford Workshop for the Templeton Course Award Program in Science and Religion, 19-24 July 1997.

P30. Line Markings. Presented to the International Rock Art Conference, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 1-6 April 1997.

P29. Oxytocin is a Many Splendored Thing: Biochemicals Usurp the Divine. Presented to Scholarship that Matters: A Trustee Review of Faculty Scholarship at the Union Institute, 16 November 1996. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP17.htm.

P28. All You Need Is...Oxytocin: Biochemicals Usurp the Divine. Presented to the 1996 Sixth European Conference on Science and Theology, Craccow, Poland. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/EP14.htm.

P27. Line Markings as Systems of Notations? (with Mary Lacombe) Presented to NEWS95: International Rock Art Congress, Torino, Italy, 30 August-6 September 1995.

P26. Sociobiology and Evil. Presented to the Eighth Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning, Toronto, Canada, 16-19 August 1995.

P25. Nonlocality and Spirituality. Presented to The Assisi Conference in Vermont, The Confluence of Matter and Spirit in the Therapeutic Situation and the Natural World, Springfield, Vermont, 30 April-3 May 1995.

P24. God the World-as-a-Whole. Presented to Workshop 3, The Concept of Nature in Science and Theology, of the Fifth European Conference on Science and Theology, The Concept of Nature in Science and Theology, Munich, Germany, 23-27 March 1994.

P23. Theology of Nature. Workshop 3, Convener, for the Fifth European Conference on Science and Theology, The Concept of Nature in Science and Theology, Munich, Germany, 23-27 March 1994.

P22. Nondenominational Associations. Presented at the symposium, Oil and Water? Institutional Interactions between Science and Religion, American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, 14 February 1993. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/SR07.htm.

P21. Physics and Environmental Philosophy. Workshop at the IRAS Star Island Conference, Global Ecology and Human Destiny, 25 July-1 August 1992.

P20. Relating Science and Theology with Hierarchies of Levels: A Caution. Presented to the Aarhus Forum Teologi Naturvidenskab, Aarhus, Denmark, 6 April 1992.

P19. Concluding Statement: Altruism after Sociobiology. Presented to the conference, Altruism: Perspectives from Evolutionary Biology, Loccum, Germany, 2-5 April 1992.

P18. Religion and Morality Intersect Biology: Sociobiology and Altruism. Presented to the conference, Altruism: Perspectives from Evolutionary Biology, Loccum, Germany, 2-5 April 1992.

P17. Theodicy and Sociobiology. Presented to Workshop 2, Origins of Mind, Culture and Morality, of the Fourth European Conference on Science and Theology, Origins, Time and Complexity in Science and Theology, Rome, Italy, 23-28 March 1992.

P16. Ethics and Values: Black and White, or Grays? Three Presentations in the St Paulís Church Adult Education Program, Concord, New Hampshire, 1-15 December 1991.

P15. Response to the Papers Presented at the ASOR/SBL/AAR Constructs of Ancient History and Religion Section, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, Kansas City, 23-26 November 1991. Available at www.ksharpe.com/word/BM12.htm.

P14. Religion and Morality Intersect Biology: Sociobiology and Altruism. Public Presentation Sponsored by the Center For Faith and Science Exchange and the Boston Theological Institute, Cambridge, MA, 7 May 1991.

P13. Misusing Quantum Physics. Presented to Workshop 2, Models and Metaphors as Carriers of Information, of the Third European Conference on Science and Theology, Information and Knowledge in Science and Theology, Geneva, Switzerland, 29 March-1 April 1990.

P12. Models and Metaphors as Carriers of Information. Workshop 2, Convener, for the Third European Conference on Science and Theology, Information and Knowledge in Science and Theology, Geneva, Switzerland, 29 March-1 April 1990.

P11. Original Sin: Is Selfishness our Inescapable Lot? (Edited.) Presented for Langdon Gilkey to the conference, Evolution and Moral Norms: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Possibility of Ethics, Evangelical Academy at Loccum, West Germany, 14-17 September 1989.

P10. Response to the Papers Presented at the Theology and Science Group, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, Chicago, 19-22 November 1988.

P9. Prehistoric Line Markings in Australia and Their Religious Significance. Presented to the Annual Meeting, American Academy of Religion, Chicago, 19-22 November 1988.

P8. Relating the Physics and Religion of David Bohm. Presented to the Summer Conference of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, Star Island, New Hampshire, August 1988.

P7. David Bohmís Physics and Religion. Presented to the Australasian Conference, Science and Theology in Action, Massey University, 14-17 August 1986.

P6. A Discussion on From Science to an Adequate Mythology. Presented to the Annual Spring Seminar, Do Scientific Understandings Help Us to Interpret Our Christian Faith? The Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, Chicago, 22 April 1986.

P5. A Response to a Paper by Ward Goodenough. Presented to the Summer Conference of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, Star Island, New Hampshire, 31 July 1985.

P4. A Discussion on From Science to an Adequate Mythology. Presented to the Council of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 26 July 1985.

P3. Mysticism in Physics. Presented to the Conference of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion, August 1981; to the Auckland Institute of Physics, Adelaide, Australia, 6 October 1981; and to the Eighth Auckland Religious Studies Colloquium, 14-16 May 1982.

P2. Gordon Kaufmanís Developing Theological Method. Presented to the Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Theological Studies, Melbourne, Australia, August 1981.

P1. Science as Our Modern Mythology and Basis for Religion. Presented to the Fourth Auckland Religious Studies Colloquium, August 1977.